In Irish mythology, Balor of the Evil Eye (sometimes spelled Balar (Balair -genitive ) or Bolar) was a king of the Fomorians, a race of giants. His father was Buarainech and his wife was Cethlenn. According to legend, he lived on Tory Island. Balor, in Celtic mythology, chief of the chaotic race of Fomoire—the demonic race that threatened the Irish people until they were subdued in the second great battle of Mag Tuired (Moytura). When Balor was a boy, he looked into a potion being brewed by his father’s Druids and the fumes caused him to grow a huge, poisonous eye. The eye had to be opened by attendants and it killed anything on which it gazed.  A prophecy predicted that Balor was to be killed by his grandson. To avoid his fate, he locked his daughter, Ethlinn, in a tower made of crystal to keep her from becoming pregnant. However, Cian, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann, managed to enter the tower with the help of the druidess Birog. Ethlinn gave birth to triplets by him but Balor threw them into the ocean. Birog saved one, Lugh, and gave him to Manannan mac Lir (sea god), who became his foster father. He was called Lugh Lamhfada and became a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann people of the goddess Danu. The prophecy came true and Balor was killed by his grandson and god Lugus (Lugh), in the climactic Battle of Magh Tuiredh between the Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomorians. Photo Dún Balair/Doon Balor meaning the Fort of Balor on Tory Island of the coast of Donegal in North West Ireland.

 

In Irish mythology, Balor of the Evil Eye (sometimes spelled Balar (Balair -genitive ) or Bolar) was a king of the Fomorians, a race of giants. His father was Buarainech and his wife was Cethlenn. According to legend, he lived on Tory Island.

Balor, in Celtic mythology, chief of the chaotic race of Fomoire—the demonic race that threatened the Irish people until they were subdued in the second great battle of Mag Tuired (Moytura). When Balor was a boy, he looked into a potion being brewed by his father’s Druids and the fumes caused him to grow a huge, poisonous eye. The eye had to be opened by attendants and it killed anything on which it gazed.

A prophecy predicted that Balor was to be killed by his grandson. To avoid his fate, he locked his daughter, Ethlinn, in a tower made of crystal to keep her from becoming pregnant. However, Cian, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann, managed to enter the tower with the help of the druidess Birog. Ethlinn gave birth to triplets by him but Balor threw them into the ocean. Birog saved one, Lugh, and gave him to Manannan mac Lir (sea god), who became his foster father. He was called Lugh Lamhfada and became a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann people of the goddess Danu.

The prophecy came true and Balor was killed by his grandson and god Lugus (Lugh), in the climactic Battle of Magh Tuiredh between the Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomorians.

Photo Dún Balair/Doon Balor meaning the Fort of Balor on Tory Island of the coast of Donegal in North West Ireland.